Chris Pratt, actor, troll, and preacher.

06.18.2018 / Culture

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Chris Pratt just received a generation achievement award from MTV so he decided to preach a sermon.

It’s not really a sermon because he had to make it funny, too. He went all Jordan Peterson on us and gave “Nine Rules from Chris Pratt, generation award winner”. The nine rules consist of 33% jokes (#1, #4, #7), 22% life advice (#3, #5), and 44% gospel lesson (#2, #9, #6, #8).

He mixes in the jokes with the gospel and even explains what he is doing (rule #4 is to trick a dog into taking his medicine by putting the medicine in a little piece of hamburger… which is exactly what he is doing.

Here’s his “gospel lesson.”

(#2) you have a soul, be careful with it.

(#9) you are imperfect.

(#6) God is real, he loves you and wants the best for you.

(#8) Learn to pray. It’s easy and so good for your soul.”

He even alluded to patriotism and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ when he said “grace is a gift. Like the freedom we enjoy in this country that grace was paid for with somebody else’s blood. Do not forget it. Don’t take it for granted.”

Beautiful work from Chris Pratt.

Here’s all the lessons in order:


Number one: breathe. If you don’t, you’ll suffocate.

Number two: You have a soul. Be careful with it.

Number three: Don’t be a turd. If you’re strong, be a protector and if you’re smart, be a humble influencer. Strength and intelligence can be weapons and do not wield them against the weak. That makes you a bully. Be bigger than that.

Number four: When giving a dog medicine, put the medicine in a little piece of hamburger and they won’t even know they’re eating medicine.

Number five: Doesn’t matter what it is, earn it. A good deed, reach out to someone in pain, be of service, it feels good and it’s good for your soul.

Number six: God is real. God loves you. God wants the best for you. Believe that. I do.

Number seven: If you have to poop at a party, but you’re embarrassed because you’re going to stink up the bathroom, just do what I do. Lock the door. Sit down, get all the pee out first. Okay? Then, when all the pee’s done, poop-flush-boom. You minimize the amount of time that the poop is touching the air because if you poop first, then it takes you longer to pee and you’re peeing on it, stirring it up and the poop particles create a cloud that goes out and then everyone at the party will know that you pooped. Just trust me, it’s science.

Number eight: Learn to pray. It’s easy and it’s so good for your soul.

Number nine: Nobody is perfect. People are going to tell you you’re perfect just the way you are; you’re not! You are imperfect. You always will be, but there’s a powerful force that designed you that way. And if you’re willing to accept that you will have grace and grace is a gift. Like the freedom we enjoy in this country that grace was paid for with somebody else’s blood. Do not forget it. Don’t take it for granted.

God bless you. Please get home safely.


Watch the video here






Rejoice!

06.15.2018 / Philosophy

Elder Porphyrios

My own idea, for what it is worth, is that all sadness which is not either arising from the repentance of a concrete sin and hastening towards concrete amendment or restitution, or else arising from pity and hastening to active assistance, is simply bad; and I think we all sin by needlessly disobeying the apostolic injunction to ‘rejoice’ as much as by anything else. Humility, after the first shock, is a cheerful virtue.

– C. S. Lewis

Cheerfulness is a choice. Or rather, it is downstream from a choice. We can choose to focus on the good, to be stubbornly grateful for the gifts we have been given, and to notice beauty whenever it arises.

We cannot avoid virtuous empathy for the suffering. We cannot avoid virtuous contrition for our own failings. But we can and should avoid almost every other form of sadness: sadness for wrongs done to us, or for our own ill fortune, or for the world not going the way we want it to.

Those who rejoice, and those who don’t, will see the consequences appear in the very lines and contours of their faces.






Oh look, another article criticizing Jordan Peterson

06.11.2018 / Politics

I recently stumbled across a Facebook group compiling Jordan Peterson “character assassinations”. It requires some scrolling to read all the articles, so I decided to put all the links into a single list.

Why? As a Peterson fan, it’s useful to consider these critiques, to hear the other side. Secondly, it’s also amusing to read the more unhinged and vitriolic hot takes people keep writing. Thirdly, if you’re not a Peterson fan, these articles might help you articulate your criticisms.

You’ll notice a smattering of articles from November 2017 through April 2018, followed by a rapid uptick of articles in May. Will June bring have another flood of articles or not?

Without further ado, a (fairly complete) list of articles criticizing JBP:

November 2017 - February 2018

  1. “Jordan Peterson is causing problems at another university now”. By Drew Brown. Vice. Nov 20, 2017
  2. “The Professor of Piffle – The dangerous underside of Jordan Peterson’s crusade against the humanities” by Ira Wells. Nov 27, 2017
  3. “The Jordan Peterson Paradox: high intellect, or just another angry white guy?” by John Semley. The Globe and Mail. January 31, 2018
  4. “Jordan Peterson’s Bull***t.” by Harrison Fluss. Jacobin Mag. February 2, 2018.
  5. “The Right’s Favorite New Intellectual Has Some Truly Pitiable Ideas About Masculinity – why does anyone take Jordan Peterson seriously?”, by Jacob Bacharach. Alternet. February 13, 2018.
  6. “Why Are So Many Young Men Drawn to Jordan Peterson’s Intellectual Misogyny?” by Grant Maxwell, APA Online. February 20, 2018.
  7. “A Serious Man”, by John Ganz. The Baffler. February 7, 2018.

March

  1. “Jordan Peterson & Fascist Mysticism”, by Pankaj Mishra. NYR Daily. March 19, 2018.
  2. “The Intellectual We Deserve”, by Nathan J. Robinson. Current Affairs. March 14, 2018
  3. “A Messiah-cum-Surrogate-Dad for Gormless Dimwits: On Jordan B. Peterson’s “12 Rules for Life””, by Houman Barekat. LA Review of Books. March 8, 2018.
  4. “How Anti-Leftism Has Made Jordan Peterson a Mark for Fascist Propoganda”, by Noah Berlatsky. Pacific Standard. March 2, 2018
  5. “Sorry, Jordan Peterson: rage isn’t a great look for a self-help guru”, by Nesrine Malik. The Guardian. March 23, 2018.

April

  1. “A (Scorching) Review of 12 Rules for Life”, by Richard Poplak. Johannesburg Review of Books. April 4, 2018.
  2. “Thus Spoke Jordan Peterson – The best-selling psychologist isn’t leading young men to salvation — he’s delivering them to authoritarianism.” by David Livingstone Smith, John Kaag. April 4, 2018.

May

  1. “Is Jordan Peterson Enabling Jew Hatred?”, by Ari Feldman. Forward. May 11, 2018
  2. “Jordan Peterson Exposed as Globalist Operative…” by Shane Trejo. PB News. May 14, 2018.
  3. “How white male victimhood got monetised”, by Damien Walter. Independent. May 16, 2018.
  4. “Jordan Peterson, Custodian of the Patriarchy” by Nellie Bowles. New York Times. May 18, 2018.
  5. “The New York Times Enters the Icy Domain of Jordan Peterson, the Incel’s Intellectual”, by Whitney Kimball. Jezebel. May 20, 2018.
  6. “Jordan Peterson Revealed as a Men’s Rights Activists”, by James S. Fell. Body for Wife. May 22, 2018
  7. “Jordan Peterson Seems Like a Terrible Therapist” by Jonathan Foiles. Slate. May 22, 2018.
  8. “Why Reasoning with Jordan Peterson Fans Can’t Work, Or: Privilege is a Feeling State”, by Matthew Remski. May 21, 2018
  9. “Jordan Peterson and the Rise of the Cargo Cult Intellectual”, by Helen Lewis. New Statesman. May 23, 2018
  10. “Jordan Peterson may be a ‘public intellectual’, but his latest theory isn’t very clever”, by Hadley Freeman. May 23, 2018
  11. “Jordan Peterson’s moment of fame — and the dangers of patriarchal pseudoscience”, by Jared Yates Sexton. Salon. May 22, 2018.
  12. “Don’t Fall For The New, Well-Groomed Alt-Right. It’s Still The Alt-Right”, by Max Koslowski. Junkee. 23 May 2018.
  13. “Solo: A Star Wars Story shows us the hero all feminist men have been waiting for”, by Damien Walter. Independent. May 23, 2018.
  14. “Jordan Peterson Is The New Chief Lobbyist For ‘Nice Guys’ And Incels” by Davide Mastracci. Huffintong Post. May 31, 2018
  15. “I was Jordan Peterson’s strongest supporter. Now I think he’s dangerous”, by Bernard Schiff. The Star. May 25, 2018.

June

  1. “Jordan Peterson is the Flat Earth Society of psychology and philosophy” by Caitlin Cohen. Dead State. June 2, 2018.
  2. “Jordan Peterson’s Anti-Christian Vision”, by Nirmal Dass. Hedge Accordingly. June 3, 2018
  3. “The Fundamental Errors of Jordan Peterson”, by Scott Oliver. Vice. June 4, 2018
  4. “Christ on a bike – the strange case of Jordan Peterson”, by Richard Cooke. The Monthly. June 6, 2018
  5. “A feminist philosopher makes the case against Jordan Peterson”, by Sean Illing. Vox. June 6, 2018.

I’ll update the list if this post is useful (just leave a comment if so). But for the most recent examples, join the Facebook group!






Where Tolkien got the Hobbit Names

05.28.2018 / Culture

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I just finished “reading” (i.e., listening to the audio books of) a few Dostoevsky novels and stories, hence my reading queue had an opening. I decided to finally return to the Prose Edda, a 13th century collection of Norse Mythologies and one of the great classics of Scandinavian literature.

It’s rough going at points. Lots of Icelandic names. That’s one of the reasons I’m listening to it on audio, as I do with Dostoevsky, rather than slogging through the text.

Anyhow, I’m stumbling through the Prose Edda, minding my own business, when I come across a remarkable passage I want to share with you Tolkien fans.

The surprising passage is from the second part of the Prose Edda, titled “Gylfaginning”, which is about the adventures of Gylfi.

In this passage, Gangleri is quizzing Harr about what he knows. Harr is then showing off his knowledge of gods and nature. At the end, Harr explains how the “dwarves” were made under the earth.

The first two long paragraphs I include to give you a flavor. Then notice the names of the dwarves at the bottom.

Read the rest...






How Gordon Pennington, Businessman and Marketing Director, Discovered Classical Education

05.27.2018 / Classical Education






Congrats to Lomachenko, three-division world champion

05.13.2018 / Culture

There was a big fight tonight… Congratulations are in order to Ukraine and to its champion boxer, Lomachenko.

Enjoy the highlights at CBS.

It was a beautiful fight. English has its Alexander Pope, tennis has its Roger Federer, boxing has its Vasyl Lomachenko.

Back in 2017, I wrote about this Orthodox Christian boxer, praising the musicality of his performances. He is a musician as much as a boxer. Rhythm, rhyme, repetition, syncopation. It’s beautiful to watch.

On May 11, I mentioned that the fight was coming up and predicted that “take down his next opponent and become a three-weight-class world champion. His fighting style is, as of now, unstoppable.” Although Lomachenko got knocked down in the sixth round he showed class by thanking Linares for teaching him a lesson.

He also showed his humility by giving credit to his father and trainer saying, “My father told me to go for the body in the final rounds, so I did.”






Jordan Peterson and Ben Shapiro Interview

05.08.2018 / Politics

This is perhaps best single Peterson interview so far. In it, Peterson develops a host of related big claims. He states and concisely explains no less than the following:

  • an account of the evolution of morality (that leaves open the possibility of divine intervention) as iterated games over time
  • an account of the evolution of social hierarchies
  • a defense of the Enlightenment
  • an explanation of why Christ is the “king of kings”, the hero of heros
  • the difference between Sam Harris and Peterson
  • an interpretation of Genesis
  • a break down and criticism of identity politics
  • a response to critics
  • a defense of cleaning your room.

My only complaint is that Shapiro keeps nodding and saying “uh huh” and “right, right” when he should just be quiet and let Peterson talk. Other than that, it’s a good interview.






Reflections on my father's passing

05.07.2018 / Misc

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6 years ago today my father passed away.

Six years ago today, I sat holding his hand, still warm, trying to comprehend that he was dead.

I arrived at the hospital a little after 10pm, just minutes after he breathed his last. Thank God I had not gone to sleep! My brother and sister were there.

The transition from this life to the next, like the transition of a baby from inside the womb to the wide world, is a sacred transition. A liminal space. Something supernatural. The nurses cleaned him up because death, like birth, is messy. It’s organic. It’s not clean or neat or Hollywood. It’s a rending. He looked like himself only his mouth was open. He knew he would pass soon, for he silently removed his wife’s hand from his chest, signaling to her that it was time for her to let him go.

Just that morning I had asked him for permission to bring the family to my church and pray the Orthodox Christian prayers for the departed, after he had passed. He said, “of course, Keith.” 40 days later, the family did come to my church and prayed. I was so glad to have his blessing.

Weeks before, I recorded poems for him from his favorite writer, Robert Frost, and sent him the audio files to listen to while in the hospital. He enjoyed them because he said they weren’t morbid or sad, just delightful. He said that visitors often wanted to visit him and be sad or share sad stories, which he was fine with. But he clearly preferred to live in the (happy) moment.

He joked to the end. He always quipped the old joke, “I’m not afraid of death. I just don’t want to be there when it happens.” Yet we have to be there when we die.

He was courageous. He had pancreatic cancer for two years. It’s not a merciful cancer; normally diagnosis is followed by death within six months or so. But he survived and even finished a book, continued his radio show, and spent a lot of quality time with us. My sister learned a saying that “cancer is the gift of time.” In other words, when someone has cancer, you feel the clock ticking and you press in for time together. I had two great years with my dad, two of the best we had together in 27 years. And I thank God for that time.

At the hospital, it was hard to comprehend, as I held his hand and felt the warmth slowly fade, that it was real. Just like imagining your baby before he arrives, it’s almost surreal when labor actually starts. But so it is. It’s real. So I tried to stay in the moment with my siblings and my other family members. We each had our own reactions. But we agreed on sacred silence.

After about 30 minutes, each of us took turns being alone with him. The male nurse was empathetic, professional, and cooperative. During my turn I poured out my heart to him. I told him about my best times with him and my worst times. I told him I would pray for him and love him and try to make him proud.

Now, six years later, I ache to think he hasn’t met my children or seen our life transitions or walked my sister down the aisle (that was my brother’s honor). But I honor him, his life, and his courageous death.






A corrupt teacher's union... and only the beginning

05.04.2018 / Classical education

It’s horrifying to hear Dr. David Perry, the President of the Hamilton Township Education Association, say this:

“I’m not here to hurt anybody. I’m here to defend. No matter the worst teachers in the world, I have defended.”

Check out Project Veritas’ new video exposing a teacher union president.

Teachers should not be invincible to accountability. On the contrary, they should be more accountable than many other professionals.

We teachers are accountable to the parents, to our students, to our administrators, to the law, and to truth itself.






Thomas Sowell on Three Kinds of Discrimination (on the Rubin Report)

04.20.2018 / Politics

This interview is edifying, informative, and challenging on multiple levels.

Dave Rubin talks with Thomas Sowell about his life, his education, and his new book on three different kinds of discrimination.

It includes a beautiful story that Sowell relates about how a young boy took him to a public library and taught him that you can read books even if you don’t buy them. That young boy gave us one of the world’s great living scholars.







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